Where do they find the time? Dev. team rocks!

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Discussion of general topics related to the new release and its place in the world. Don't discuss new features, report bugs, ask for support, et cetera. Don't use this to spam for other boards or attack those boards!
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aaldere1
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Where do they find the time? Dev. team rocks!

Post by aaldere1 »

Hi all. A big hats off to all the HARD WORK of the phpBB team as they plow through the bugs (squish, squish!) and maintain stability on the forums. Since I know nothing about the language of PHP code and other misc. issues concerning how they make everything work, I'm wondering how much work they put in per day? Is the development team a bunch of normal guys who go to school, have other jobs, then write this stuff at night? Or, is this their full-time job?

I guess I'm just wondering about how this development takes place - if people get paid for it, or if they do it out of their own good and kind free will? If you guys are able to maintain a job, families, in parallel with taking care of getting this made for the general public, I'm definitely impressed.

:) :)
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Lastof
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Re: Where do they find the time? Dev. team rocks!

Post by Lastof »

They do it all for free (and our love and devotion, and command of a horde of honey addicted cute cuddly violent killer bears). This is just a "hobby" for them (though, it probably takes up at least as much time as their "real" jobs).
Last edited by Lastof on 04 May 2008, 00:00, edited -1 times in total
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aaldere1
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Re: Where do they find the time? Dev. team rocks!

Post by aaldere1 »

That's just incredible. If that is the case, then people should never complain. :)
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frechdaxx
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Re: Where do they find the time? Dev. team rocks!

Post by frechdaxx »

I'm really impressed too. Thx for your great work :)
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Re: Where do they find the time? Dev. team rocks!

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aaldere1
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Re: Where do they find the time? Dev. team rocks!

Post by aaldere1 »



I'm aware of the wikipedia definition, although I'm sure this does not apply to all material. I did, however, find this fascinating.
Critics of "open source" publishing cite the need for direct compensation for the work of creation. For example, the act of writing a book, building a complex piece of software, or producing a motion picture can take a substantial number of person-hours. Retaining intellectual property rights over such works greatly increases the feasibility of obtaining financial compensation which covers the labor costs. Proponents argue that without this compensation, many socially desirable and useful works would never be created in the first place. Some critics draw distinctions between areas where open source collaborations have successfully created useful products, such as general-purpose software, and areas where they see compensation as more important and collaboration as less important, such as highly specialized complex software projects, entertainment, or news.

Another criticism of the open source movement is that these projects are not really as self-organizing as their proponents claim. This argument holds that open source projects succeed only when they have a strong central manager, even if that manager is a volunteer. The article Open Source Projects Manage Themselves? Dream On. by Chuck Connell explains this viewpoint. Eric Raymond responded to this criticism here, and Chuck Connell answered here.

The Free Software Foundation (FSF) opposes the term "open source" and the professed pragmatism of the open source movement, as they fear that the free software ideals of freedom and community are threatened by compromising on the FSF's idealistic standards for software freedom.[12]
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